Sunday, October 22, 2006

Yellow-browed Warbler in Wisconsin???

This is shaping up to be a spectacular month of October for Midwest birders. Green-tailed Towhee and Rock Wren in Michigan, a grebe explosion here in Illinois in the Palos area (Western Grebe + multiple Red-necked grebes for a start), and we haven't even paid much attention to other states to see what else is around.

Now, to top things off, there has been a report of a Yellow-browed Warbler (!) at Bradford Beach just north of Milwaukee. We've heard that searchers have failed to re-find this bird today, but if the report is legit, this bird may be headed south along the Lake Michigan lakefront. We've gotten multiple reports that there was a very nice movement of passerines along the lakefront today, so who knows what other rarities may have moved into Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana today.

4 comments:

Seldom said...

I would love to believe this report because it would be such a spectacular record, however it is such a mindblower that I don't think there is much hope of a Records Committee accepting it without a photo. If you read the finder's email he lists the other species that were in the flock including Ruby-crowned Kinglet, but not Golden-crowned Kinglet. That gives me pause to say the least given the superficial similarity. I know if I had found this bird I wouldn't have watched it for twenty minutes. I would have watched it for two or three, made notes and a sketch, then gone off on a frantic search for anyone with a camera!

As for other stuff on the move, check out the Gray Jay invasion in North Dakaota and Minnesota, and the big movement of Black-backed and Am. Three-toed Woodpeckers on the North Shore.

Bill Pulliam said...

Now this truly is an extraordinary claim! I might think an unlikely hybrid (such as a Golden- X Ruby-crowned Kinglet) would be more likely than an old-world vagrant that is accidental even on the farthest flung peripheries of the North American continent turning up in the middle of said continent. But, just about anything can happen in the bird world. Let's hope it gets relocated!

Patrick Belardo said...

I think there was one found in Alaska this year. Is it even in the regular field guides? I don't know the finder, but did they identify it on the spot or look it up later?

Bill Pulliam said...

Details in the original listserv posting were limited, but the bird was looked up later, not identified in the field. The description pretty much was "body of a kinglet, head of a tennessee warbler" and not a lot more. Doesn't seem to have been relocated.

Loooooooong way from Alaska to Wisconsin...